(Reblogged from rrrick)
houseofjules2:

I love that there’s a word for this.
Good company elevates every experience, no matter what it is. Give me good company and terrible everything else, and the terrible everything else won’t really even register because I have good company.
Related: Being good company is just as important as having good company.

houseofjules2:

I love that there’s a word for this.

Good company elevates every experience, no matter what it is. Give me good company and terrible everything else, and the terrible everything else won’t really even register because I have good company.

Related: Being good company is just as important as having good company.

(Source: word-stuck)

(Reblogged from houseofjules2)
Turning and turning in the widening gyre
The falcon cannot hear the falconer;
Things fall apart; the centre cannot hold;
Mere anarchy is loosed upon the world,
The blood-dimmed tide is loosed, and everywhere
The ceremony of innocence is drowned;
The best lack all conviction, while the worst
Are full of passionate intensity.
W.B. Yeats,
The Second Coming (via lonequixote)
(Reblogged from xineann)
You can’t find intimacy—you can’t find home—when you’re always hiding behind masks. Intimacy requires a certain level of vulnerability. It requires a certain level of you exposing your fragmented, contradictory self to someone else. You’re running the risk of having your core self rejected and hurt and misunderstood.
Junot Diaz (via houseofjules2)

(Source: wordsthat-speak)

(Reblogged from houseofjules2)
thecolorsofmymind:

 Leaving the light on for you …

thecolorsofmymind:


Leaving the light on for you …
(Reblogged from thecolorsofmymind)

humansofnewyork:

"I don’t know much about him. My aunt tells me that he was smart and funny, and that I’m a lot like him because I’m stubborn. I know that I have his nose. But other than that, he’s just the man who walked out on me and my mother. He’d call every few months when I was really young, but eventually that stopped. I can’t convince myself that he’s mean, because then I’ll be angry forever. I’m sure plenty of people who know him think that he’s a really nice guy."
"Would you like to know him?"
"I can’t say that I want to know him really, but I would like to know about him. I’d like to see how he behaves, how he walks, if he seems different than the other people I see on the street. I’m interested in his story just like I’m interested in everyone else’s story. Only a little more so, because I’m a part of his story."

(Mexico City, Mexico)

“…I’m interested in his story just like I’m interested in everyone else’s story. Only a little more so, because I’m a part of his story.”

(Reblogged from humansofnewyork)

Snapped while out walking near Immigrant Lake, Ashland, OR

Madonna - Shoo-Bee-Doo (Album Version)

Still love this song.  May be weird, or unexpected, but who really cares?

Madonna - Love Don’t Live Here Anymore (Album Version)

humansofnewyork:

I walked into a classroom where some young Tibetan students were practicing their chants, and all the kids suddenly grew very focused and well-behaved on account of the visitor. Except for this guy, who started laughing at me. Then he started laughing at himself laughing. Then he started laughing that he couldn’t stop laughing at himself laughing.

(Dharamshala, India)

THE FLOWER SERMON

Toward the end of his life, the Buddha took his disciples to a quiet pond for instruction. As they had done so many times before, the Buddha’s followers sat in a small circle around him, and waited for the teaching.

But this time the Buddha had no words. He reached into the muck and pulled up a lotus flower. And he held it silently before them, its roots dripping mud and water.

The disciples were greatly confused. Buddha quietly displayed the lotus to each of them. In turn, the disciples did their best to expound upon the meaning of the flower: what it symbollized, and how it fit into the body of Buddha’s teaching.

When at last the Buddha came to his follower Mahakasyapa, the disciple suddenly understood. He smiled and began to laugh. Buddha handed the lotus to Mahakasyapa and began to speak.

“What can be said I have said to you,” smiled the Buddha, “and what cannot be said, I have given to Mahakashyapa.”

Mahakashyapa became Buddha’s successor from that day forward.

(Reblogged from humansofnewyork)

"I have a doctorate in Buddhist philosophy. Now I want to learn as many languages as possible so I can teach as many people as possible."
“What do you think is the most important thing that people can learn from Buddhism?”
“Compassion. Everyone suffers and everyone needs happiness.”

(Dharamshala, India)

(Source: fi2u)

(Reblogged from ybb55)

— Richard Brautigan